Thanksgiving Leftovers Recipe: Turkey Cobb Salad with Ranch Dressing

Serves 4

Everybody loves a turkey sandwich for the post-Thanksgiving meal, but sometimes, after all that food, you just want a salad. This Cobb platter can be quite versatile to accommodate a range of leftovers. Use up fresh herbs you may have on hand in a zesty ranch dressing that will keep in the refrigerator for several days. Avoid yet another kitchen mess by roasting the bacon on a metal rack in the oven; It may take longer, but no one will have to clean the stovetop again. Hard-cook a couple of eggs, and pull enough turkey off the bones to make 3 cups, more or less. From there, substitutions abound. No blue cheese? Use goat. No dried cranberries? Use dried cherries or even raisins. If all the pecans went into the pie, sprinkle walnuts or almonds on the salad. Instead of pepitas, use sunflower seeds or leave them off. Add pears instead of apples, layer on cold, roasted carrots or hunks of squash. Nothing you have left from the feast should go to waste. Redefine the old-fashioned Cobb as a delicious post-holiday catch-all.

DRESSING

½ cup sour cream
¼ cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons buttermilk or 2 tablespoons whole milk mixed with 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar
1 tablespoon cider vinegar or white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon maple syrup
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
1 One tablespoon chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon chopped fresh theme
2 cloves garlic grated
Salt and pepper, to taste

1. In a bowl, combine the sour cream, mayonnaise, buttermilk or whole milk mix, vinegar, maple syrup, parsley, sage, thyme, and garlic.

2. Add a generous pinch each of salt and pepper. Whisk well. Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper, if you like.

SALAD

12 ounces bacon
1 cup pecans
2 eggs
3 romaine hearts, torn (about 8 cups)
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 large apple, chopped
3 cups cooked, shredded turkey
6 ounces blue cheese, crumbled
4 Callions, chopped
¼ a cup of dried cranberries
¼ cup pepitas

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Have on hand a rimmed baking sheet with a metal rack inside and a small baking dish.

2. Lay the strips of bacon on the metal rack. Bake the bacon for 40 to 45 minutes, or until it’s golden and crisp. Remove from the oven and transfer the strips to a plate lined with paper towels. When the bacon is cool enough to handle, chop it.

3. In the baking dish, spread the pecans. Toast in the oven for 5 to 10 minutes, or until aromatic; cool.

4. In a small saucepan, combine the eggs with water to cover by 1 inch. Bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat. Lower the heat slightly and cook for 8 minutes. Drain the eggs and run them under cold water. Peel the eggs, dry them on paper towels, and quarter them.

5. In a large bowl, toss the romaine with cider vinegar, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Transfer it to a large plate.

6. Arrange the bacon, eggs, apple, turkey, blue cheese, and scallions in wide bands across the romaine. Garnish with dried cranberries and pepitas. Serve the dressing on the side.

Caroline Boehm Goodnick

Serves 4

Everybody loves a turkey sandwich for the post-Thanksgiving meal, but sometimes, after all that food, you just want a salad. This Cobb platter can be quite versatile to accommodate a range of leftovers. Use up fresh herbs you may have on hand in a zesty ranch dressing that will keep in the refrigerator for several days. Avoid yet another kitchen mess by roasting the bacon on a metal rack in the oven; It may take longer, but no one will have to clean the stovetop again. Hard-cook a couple of eggs, and pull enough turkey off the bones to make 3 cups, more or less. From there, substitutions abound. No blue cheese? Use goat. No dried cranberries? Use dried cherries or even raisins. If all the pecans went into the pie, sprinkle walnuts or almonds on the salad. Instead of pepitas, use sunflower seeds or leave them off. Add pears instead of apples, layer on cold, roasted carrots or hunks of squash. Nothing you have left from the feast should go to waste. Redefine the old-fashioned Cobb as a delicious post-holiday catch-all.

DRESSING

½ cup sour cream
¼ cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons buttermilk or 2 tablespoons whole milk mixed with 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar
1 tablespoon cider vinegar or white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon maple syrup
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
1 One tablespoon chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon chopped fresh theme
2 cloves garlic grated
Salt and pepper, to taste

1. In a bowl, combine the sour cream, mayonnaise, buttermilk or whole milk mix, vinegar, maple syrup, parsley, sage, thyme, and garlic.

2. Add a generous pinch each of salt and pepper. Whisk well. Taste for seasoning and add more salt and pepper, if you like.

SALAD

12 ounces bacon
1 cup pecans
2 eggs
3 romaine hearts, torn (about 8 cups)
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 large apple, chopped
3 cups cooked, shredded turkey
6 ounces blue cheese, crumbled
4 Callions, chopped
¼ a cup of dried cranberries
¼ cup pepitas

1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Have on hand a rimmed baking sheet with a metal rack inside and a small baking dish.

2. Lay the strips of bacon on the metal rack. Bake the bacon for 40 to 45 minutes, or until it’s golden and crisp. Remove from the oven and transfer the strips to a plate lined with paper towels. When the bacon is cool enough to handle, chop it.

3. In the baking dish, spread the pecans. Toast in the oven for 5 to 10 minutes, or until aromatic; cool.

4. In a small saucepan, combine the eggs with water to cover by 1 inch. Bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat. Lower the heat slightly and cook for 8 minutes. Drain the eggs and run them under cold water. Peel the eggs, dry them on paper towels, and quarter them.

5. In a large bowl, toss the romaine with cider vinegar, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Transfer it to a large plate.

6. Arrange the bacon, eggs, apple, turkey, blue cheese, and scallions in wide bands across the romaine. Garnish with dried cranberries and pepitas. Serve the dressing on the side. Caroline Boehm Goodnick